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IBT Module 1

** SPECIAL OFFER **   When you buy online

IBT Module 1 for a Special Offer Price of 50 Euro

You can then complete the rest of your IBT for 290 euro on your own bike or 320 on a school bike.

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Sunday, 27 April 2014 00:00

Mick Smyth

Our instructors are full time professionals and are approved by the RSA. They emphasise defensive riding and riding responsibility. Safety is our first priority.

Mick Smyth ADI 35316

RoSPA Gold, RoSPA Diploma in Advanced Riding Instruction, DIAmond Advanced

Sunday, 27 April 2014 00:00

Mick Finlay

Our instructors are full time professionals and are approved by the RSA. They emphasise defensive riding and riding responsibility. Safety is our first priority.

Mick Finlay ADI 35559

RoSPA Gold, RoSPA Diploma in Advanced Riding Instruction, DIAmond Advanced

Sunday, 27 April 2014 00:00

Licenses

 

 

The information contained herein is, to the best of our knowledge complete and accurate on the date of issue however we cannot accept any responsibility or liability for any errors or omissions.Irish motorbike licences

DRIVING LICENCES FOR MOTORCYCLES

REGULATIONS

From 1 December 2007 motorcyclists on a learner permit (provisional licence) have had to wear a yellow, fourescent tabard (not a vest or jacket) with regulation sized L plates showing both back and front.. This applies to all learner permits\ provisional licences regardless of date of issue.

The requirement is that a person with a learner permit (provisional licence) for category A, A1, or M, shall not drive such a vehicle unless there are displayed on a yellow fluorescent tabard worn over the person’s outside clothing, the letter ‘L’, not less than 15 centimetres high in red on a white ground in clearly visible vertical positions to the front and rear of the person’s torso.

From 30 October 2007, there is a restriction in relation to making application for a driving test. From this date a person who is granted a learner permit for a vehicle in category A, A1, M, by a licensing authority and has not previously held, within the period of 5 years prior to the granting, such a permit in that category, is not entitled to make an application for a driving test within the period of 6 months from the day the permit comes into force. This provision also applies to categories W, B or EB. In order to ride a motorcycle or moped in a public place a person must hold a current driving licence or a Learner Permit in Category M, A1 or A.

Note also that carrying a pillion passenger when you only have a provisional licence or learner’s permit is now a penal offence (ie; you can be imprisoned rather that just fined and given penalty points, which can also happen!)

The ‘A’ is Learner Permit from 18 years of age for motorcycles, with or without a sidecar, subject to a power limit before the Driving Test and for 2 years afterwards of 25Kw/34bhp. or a power to weight ratio of less than 0.16kW per kg) – the restriction continuing for two years after taking out a full licence in that category. However, at a cost, virtually any bike can have its power reduced to come within these limits.

The Driving Test must be taken on a motorcycle over 125cc. This is the first-choice motorcycle licence.

The ‘A1’ Learner Permit is available from 16 years of age, but will restrict the holder to motorcycles of 50cc to 125cc and a 11Kw/14.5bhp limit. Even if you pass the ‘125’ Driving Test, when you up-grade to a bike over 125cc you will need an ‘A’ licence provisional, a second ‘test’ on a bike over 150cc, and endure all restrictions.

The ‘M’ Learner Permit is strictly for mopeds, or engine-assisted bicycles, under 50cc with a top speed of below 45kmp /28mph and is available from 16. The holders of a full ‘B’ licence, with additional insurance, can also drive mopeds.

Note that both a Learner Permit and a provisional licence do not entitle you to carry a pillion passenger. Nor are you permitted to use motorways.

Any person wishing to obtain a third or subsequent provisional licence must have undergone a driving test within the previous two years. However, a person who is due to undergo a test and whose licence is expiring may obtain a 12 month provisional licence on production of their driving test appointment letter.

Application forms for the driving test are meant to be available from the licensing authority and most Post Offices, Garda Stations and Libraries. After filing your test-application you will receive a letter of acknowledgement with a leaflet “preparing for your driving test” and in due course an appointment for your test. Note the minimum cc.

Motorcycle Safety Associates Ltd – Rider Training Programme. flow chart

licenses clip image001 0000

THE DRIVING TEST

You must learn (not just read once!) the "Rules of the Road" available from Post Offices, Easons and other bookshops, and we would also recommend "Motorcycle Roadcraft - the Police Rider's Handbook" also available from Eason's and other good bookshops. (ISBN 0-11-341143-X).

We strongly recommend that wherever possible, you seek the assistance of a good riding instructor. Whether you can obtain quality training or not, we recommend that you practice riding as much as possible on all types of roads and in different types of traffic situations.

The driving test is designed to establish whether you:

  • Know the Rules of the Road;
  • Have the knowledge and skill to ride competently in accordance with those rules;
  • Can ride with due regard for the safety and convenience of other road users.

When the day of your test finally arrives, you should be present at the test centre early. You will need to bring your provisional license, insurance certificate and will have to sign a declaration stating your bike is in roadworthy condition. Please Note;

The bike must be taxed and the tax disc displayed

Motorcyclists on a learner permit (provisional licence) have had to wear a yellow, fluorescent tabard (not a vest or jacket) with regulation sized L plates showing both back and front.. This applies to all learner permits\ provisional licences regardless of date of issue.

Tyres must be of adequate tread depth [Minimum for a bike is 1 mm] Your motorcycle must have a headlamp (white or yellow), a red rear lamp, a red rear reflector and rear number plate lighting.

It is not a requirement to have indicators, brake light or mirrors, but if fitted, they must be in working order. If not fitted, hand signals must be used in the test. You may be required to use hand signals as well as indicators. Using the mirrors is permitted but a quick "lifesaver" backwards glance in some situations when for example changing lanes would be required also.

Your appearance makes a lasting first impression, wearing good motorcycling gear; helmet with clean visor, proper jacket, proper trousers (NOT jeans), boots, good gloves and at least a bandoleer, better still a florescent vest gives the right impression, its says you are serious and sensible, not "Jack the Lad". Look the part and you are half way there.

It is in your own best interests to give a good impression and a clean and tidy bike and rider will look better than a scruffball on a "rat"!

After signing the declaration, you will be given an oral examination on the Rules of the Road and then asked to demonstrate the various hand signals.

Moving out to your machine, the examiner will check that it is in a roadworthy condition. You will then be instructed on what route to take, you are not in radio contact as in most countries, the examiner will be following behind you in a car (all motorcycle test examiners hold a full motorcycle license). In exceptional circumstances i.e. heavy traffic congestion the tester may observe the rider from on foot. Don't forget to apply the front brake when mounting the bike!

You may be asked to do left-hand circuits of a block and then right-hand circuits, and after a while he will pull in and flag you down. At some stage you will be asked to do a U turn in a quiet road which would normally be about 26 feet wide.

You are expected to do this turn 'feet up', but points may not be lost for using a foot to steady the bike. In the case of some race replica and full-dressed tourers, you may not be able to 'do it in one' so you are permitted to do a 2-point turn. What you have to do is show that you are in full control, and keeping a good lookout for any traffic, while performing the maneuver. You will then be asked to ride slowly, at 'walking pace' for around 50 metres, again to demonstrate your machine-control capabilities.

Remember to apply the rear brake with your right foot whenever stationary.

  • You will be asked to show that you know that any 3 of the following items are functioning correctly:
    • Tyres
    • Lights
    • Reflector
    • Indicators
    • Brakes
    • Steering Oil level(s)
    • Chain
    • Horn
    • Kill switch
  • You will be asked to show that you know how to put the bike on, and take it off the stand - either side or centre stand is acceptable.
  • You will be asked to move the machine safely without the aid of the engine, for 4 to 5 metres.

The test candidate will be provided with a radio receiver, and will receive directions from the tester via an ear-piece connection. The tester will follow behind the candidate in a car. The radio equipment will enable more extensive test routes to be used than has been the case. This means that the former practice of just learning the local test route has become a thing of the past. From now on you will need to be able to ride to the standard anywhere. Some short verbal feedback will be offered to the candidate by the examiner, at the end of the test.

That's it! If you pass you will receive a certificate of competency to drive which is valid for two years - if you do not take out a full license during this period you will obliged to pass the driving test again.

Please note a Certificate of Competency is not a full license and it does not entitle you to drive on motorways or to carry a pillion passenger. You must exchange this certificate for a full license

If you fail you will receive a detailed report on the faults that occurred during the test. The most common causes of failure are:

  • A lack of "observation" - this includes rearwards observation (tip: you might be able to glance in your mirror without a perceptible movement of your head, but how can an examiner, perhaps 50 yards behind you in a car be convinced you have? So move the head a bit - just enough to show you were looking).
  • Lack of Progress, going TOO slowly, very common especially at right hand turns. (Conversely, this does not mean cutting across approaching traffic at high speed to do the right hand turn, simply that you should not ride around in a hesitant manner). If you don't look capable examiners tend to think you aren't!
  • Inadequate Signaling: far less of a problem if you have indicators and use them properly and effectively and remember to cancel them.
  • Road Positioning: from observation this is where many an 'experienced' motorcyclist falls down. It ought to be possible for a vehicle behind you to discern your intentions from your positioning on the road. Attempting a right turn from the left gutter, or a left turn from the white line are not procedures calculated to impress an examiner.
  • Passing too close to parked cars and pedestrians: car doors can open suddenly (always assume they will!) so ride that if one did your path would be clear of it. So too pedestrians, by now you should KNOW most step off the kerb and, if they look at all, they look LEFT - and you are coming from the RIGHT!

The test is very, very basic . Passing this test DOES NOT MEAN you are a safe, capable and proficient motorcyclist ready to ride anywhere, at any time in all conditions. You are still, very much, "an accident waiting to happen". We most strongly recommend further post-test training, such as the MSA Intermediate or Advanced courses which aim at a very high all-round standard and includes riding at night, in adverse conditions, on motorways, carrying luggage and carrying a passenger. Beyond that there is the very demanding Advanced Test which is the highest civilian qualification you can attain.

Statistics show that approx 50% of those who take the test fail first time. Those who have been trained by us and completed a Pre-test course have achieved a 98% pass rate. Depending on the amount of prior training you have had a Pre test takes from3 to 6 hrs in most cases.

This means that if you are sitting your motorcycle test for categories A1, A2 or A on or after the 30th November 2013, the changes below will apply to you. These changes are related to the motorcycle being presented at the rsa test centre.

The following are the changes which will be in effect from that date:

A 5 cc tolerance on the cylinder capacity (cc) for all motorcycle categories presented at the driving test centre.

The Driver Testing Service provided for this tolerance to be incorporated in the changes to representative vehicles for the driving test introduced on the 19th January 2013 for categories A and A2. For category A, the 5cm3 tolerance was applied to the minimum 600cm3 making the vehicle requirement at least 595cm3. For category A2, the 5cm3 tolerance was applied to the 400cm3 making the vehicle minimum requirement at least 395cm3. These tolerance levels still apply.

The change in November relates to the 5cm3 tolerance being also applied to category A1, which means that the minimum acceptable cylinder capacity changes from 120cm3 to 115cm3 for the purposes of the driving test. The official definition of a category A1 motorcycle as a representative vehicle for the driving test will therefore be changed to:

“A Category A1 motorcycle without sidecar, with a cylinder capacity of at least 115cm3 and not exceeding 125cm3, and capable of a speed of at least 90km/h, with a power not exceeding 11kW and with a power/weight ratio not exceeding 0.1kW/kg. If the motorcycle is powered by an electric motor, the power to weight ratio of the vehicle shall be at least 0.08 kW/kg”.

Unladen mass for category A motorcycles for the driving test

With effect from the 30th November 2013, there is a requirement that any category A vehicle presenting for the driving test must have an unladen mass (unladen weight) of more than 180kg with a 5kg tolerance. Therefore, only motorcycles with an unladen mass of over 175kg will be acceptable for driving test purposes.

Driver Testing Section is currently creating a list for customers with the most common motorcycles, which incorporates whether they meet the requirement for unladen mass for the purposes of the driving test. This list will be available before the 30th November 2013 on this website.

Change to kW requirement for category A2 vehicles for the driving test

The kW requirement for category A2 motorcycles presenting for the driving test which were introduced on the 19th January 2013, required at least 25kW but not exceeding 35kW.

From 30th November 2013, the minimum requirement is changing from 25kW to 20kW. The official definition of a category A2 motorcycle as a representative vehicle for the driving test will therefore be changed to:

“A Category A2 motorcycle without sidecar, with a cylinder capacity of at least 395cm3, and an engine power of at least 20kW, but not exceeding 35kW and with a power/weight ratio not exceeding 0.2kW/kg and not derived from a vehicle of more than double its power. If the motorcycle is powered by an electric motor, the power to weight ratio of the vehicle shall be at least 0.15kW/kg”.

Change in kW requirement for category A vehicles for the driving test

The kW requirement for category A motorcycles presenting for the driving test which was introduced on the 19th January 2013, required at least 40kW.

From 30th November 2013, the minimum requirement is changing from 40kW to 50kW. The official definition of a category A motorcycle as a representative vehicle for the driving test will therefore be changed to:

“A Category A motorcycle without sidecar, whose unladen mass is more than 175kg, with an engine power of at least 50kW. If the motorcycle is powered by an internal combustion engine, the cubic capacity of the engine shall be at least 595cm3. If the motorcycle is powered by an electric motor, the power to weight ratio of the vehicle shall be at least 0.25kW/kg”. 

 

Source: RSA.ie

Saturday, 17 October 2015 00:00

The Theory Test

What you need to know about this key knowledge test for learner drivers. There are also theory tests for RSA approved driving instructors and professional drivers (CPC).

 

 

Driver theory test

The learner driver theory test was introduced in 2001. By law, before applying for a learner permit, candidates must complete and pass a test of their general road safety knowledge and motoring legislation. It applies to anyone applying for a first learner permit in any vehicle category.

The test is designed to check knowledge of topics such as:

  • Rules of the Road
  • Risk perception
  • Eco-driving
  • Hazard awareness
  • Good driving behaviour

The test is computer-based but, like the fast check-in kiosks at airports, is designed for those who have little or no experience of using computers as well as those who do.

You will have a chance to take a practice session on the day before starting on the actual test. If you have special needs please contact the Driver Theory Service and explain your requirements.

Driver Theory Service contact:
1890 606 106 (English language)
1890 606 806 (Irish language)
1890 616 216 (text phone – for the hearing-impaired)

There are separate theory tests for driving instructors and for professional bus and truck drivers:

Approved Driving Instructor (ADI)
Driver CPC (Certificate in Professional Competency)

Latest version

A comprehensive review of the Driver Theory Test Study material Book and CD-Rom took place in 2011 with a view to improving the content and its effectiveness as a learning tool. Most of the 1500 questions in the Driver Theory Test 4th Edition have been updated revised or replaced. The revisions include new questions and graphics as well as amended versions of existing questions.

All exams for car, motorcycle, bus and truck categories contain new and amended questions. The format of the test, based on multiple choice questions, has remained unchanged and candidates are required to answer correctly 35 out of 40 questions in order to obtain a pass certificate. Candidates at the end of their exam will regardless of passing or failing also be provided, based on their performance, with a list of the categories recommended for further study e.g. Road Signs, Markings and Traffic Regulations, Alert Driving and Consideration for Road Users etc. All of these correspond to the categories listed in the training Material in order to facilitate revision or help improve overall skills.

The complete list of updated questions is published in the Official Driver Theory Test Book (5th edition) and CD-Rom. These are available to purchase online at www.theorytest.ie and in book shops nationwide. The CD provides ‘Practice Tests’ which simulate the real exam experience and allow candidates to gauge their learning progress. People presenting for the driver theory test on or after the 24th October 2011 must have studied the new study material. i.e. The Official Driver Theory Test 5th Edition Book or CD-Rom.

Test categories

There are four categories of theory test (see table below). Each test cateogry corresponds to a driver-licence or learner-permit category. If you take a test listed in the first column, you are covered for all the licences or learner permits in the corresponding column.

Theory test certificateDriver licence or learner-permit category
B and W Covers cars, land tractors and work vehicles B, EB and W
A and M Covers motorcycles and mopeds A, A1, A2 and M
C Covers vans and trucks over 3,500kg C1, C, EC and EC1
D Minibuses and buses D, D1, Ed and ED1

If you are applying for your first learner permit you must:

  • http://www.aaronridertraining.com/templates/arron/images/postbullets.png); background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat;">Include a theory test certificate for the relevant category along with your learner-permit application, unless the certificate has already been submitted
  • http://www.aaronridertraining.com/templates/arron/images/postbullets.png); background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat;">Present the certificate within two years of the date of issue (date of passing the test)

Note: you will be regarded as an applicant for a first learner permit in respect of a particular vehicle category if you have not held such a licence in the preceding five years.

Booking a test

The theory test is managed on behalf of the RSA by a test partner, which operates a number of lo-call helplines to answer queries about the test and take test bookings:

1890 606 106 (English language)
1890 606 806 (Irish language)
1890 616 216 (text phone – for the hearing-impaired)

The postal address of the testing service is:

PO Box 788
Togher
Cork

Application forms are available from the testing service and from all local motor taxation offices.

Tests are held in 41 driving test centres around the country.

The test is offered in both Irish and English and candidates with special requirements can be accommodated.  A Polish, voiceover is available in all category of vehicles. A Russian and Lithuanian voiceover is available for the category B (car).

 

Source: AaronRiderTraining

Saturday, 17 October 2015 00:00

Getting on the Road

So you want to ride a motorcycle, and you are not sure where to start?

The basic steps are

  1. Do the driver theory test (www.theorytest.ie)
  2. Get your Learner Permit (www.ndls.ie)
  3. Do your Initial Basic Training with an approved instructor (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
  4. Sit the practical test (www.rsa.ie)

Minimum Age:
There are legal restrictions on what types of vehicle you can drive at what age.

Licence Category Description of category from 19 January 2013 Minimum Age
  Mopeds and three wheeled vehicles with maximum design speed greater than 25km/h but not greater than 45km/h as well as light quadricycles. 16 years
  Motorcycles with an engine capacity not exceeding 125 cubic centimetres, with a power rating not exceeding 11 kW and with a power to weight ratio not exceeding 0.1 kW/kg.Motor tricycles with a power rating not exceeding 15 kW. 16 years
  Motorcycles with a power rating not exceeding 35 kW, with a power to weight ratio not exceeding 0.2 kW/kg and not derived from a vehicle of more than double its power. 18 years
  Motorcycles & Motor tricycles 24 years or 20 with progressive access*

* Progressive Access means upgrading from an existing entitlement to the next available level.


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Step 1: The  Driver Theory Test

Before applying for a learner permit, you must pass a test of general road safety knowledge and motoring legislation – the driver theory test. It applies to anyone applying for a first learner permit in any vehicle category. To quote the RSA;

The test is designed to check knowledge of topics such as:
•    Rules of the Road
•    Risk perception
•    Eco-driving
•    Hazard awareness
•    Good driving behaviour

Computer-based and easy to use, the theory test is designed for those who have little or no experience of using computers as well as those who do. You can do a practice session on the day before starting on the actual test.

Apply by Phone;

Driver Theory Service:
1890 606 106 (English language)
1890 606 806 (Irish language)
1890 616 216 (text phone – for the hearing-impaired)

Or by post;

PO Box 788
Togher
Cork

Cost is: €45.
 

Step 2:  Getting your Learner Permit.
Sample Learner Permit

Sample Learner Permit

If you are applying for your first learner permit you must include a theory test certificate along with your learner-permit application.
Note that these theory test certs have a ‘lifespan’ of two years from date of issue, so you must apply for the Learner Permit within two years of date of issue of the theory test certificate.
 
What is a “Learner Permit”?
A learner permit is a licence issued to learner drivers. It enables them to learn to drive and to apply for a driving test at the same time.

The learner permit replaces the old provisional licence, which is no longer issued.
 
N.B: a Learner Permit is issued for each class of licence – so you need a Class ‘A’ permit for a Class ‘A’ vehicle. Class ‘A1’ permit for a Class ‘A1’ vehicle etc.

Step 3: Initial Basic Training (I.B.T.)

From Dec. 6th 2010:

All new first time learner permit holders for motorcycles are required to undertake Initial Basic Training (IBT) with an Approved Driving Instructor (ADI).
The course is spread over 4 modules. Once this course of lessons is complete the learner permit holder will be issued with a certificate which must be kept with their learner permit.

  • Motorcycle riders must complete the program before driving unsupervised on the road while a learner.
  • Evidence of completing the lessons will be signed off in a learner’s logbook by the Approved Driving Instructor.
  • Evidence of having taken the lessons will have to be presented before taking a driving test.

Click Here for Full details of the Initial Basic Training

Step 4: The Practical Test

The RSA has a written a very good article on their own website about the test – it’s here;

http://rsa.ie/en/RSA/Learner-Drivers/Motorcyclists/The-Motorcycle-Test/

The test fee is now  €75!!!
So it only makes sense that if at all possible – you only have to do this once!


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As with anything these days, there are some terms and conditions:

Restrictions:

  • The type of learner permit you hold dictates what, if any, power restrictions are in place as you learn
  • Since January 19th 2013, Learner permits will have restrictions as outlined in the table above.
  • Learner Permits Licences issued prior to January 2013 generally have a restriction limiting the power of the motorcycle to 25kW or 0.16 kW/kg. (This was the cause of much confusion and the subject of a MAG Ireland 25kW Information sheet)
  • S.I. 537/2006 states that a person who holds a learner permit in:
    • Vehicle categories AM, A1, A2 and A (motorcycles/mopeds) is not permitted to carry a passenger.
    • Any vehicle category is not allowed to carry any passenger for reward  (which may imply you cannot work as a courier or pizza delivery for example.)

Vehicles in categories AM, A1, A2 and A (motorcycles and mopeds) must also display L plates at all times. L-tabardThe plates must be displayed on a yellow fluorescent tabard worn over the person’s outside clothing. The letter L should be at least 15cm high and appear as red on a white background and in clearly visible vertical positions to the front and rear of the person’s body.

Note:
A number of penal offenses have been introduced for learner drivers. These include not displaying ‘L’ plates when driving, and the carrying of a passenger by a learner motorcyclist. These offenses are punishable by a minimum €1,000 fine for a first offense.

The 6 month wait for a test:
If you are granted a learner permit for vehicles in category A, A2, A1, or AM, and have not held a learner permit in the five-year period prior to the granting of a permit in any of these categories you cannot sit a driving test within six months of your permit coming into force, although you may apply for a test within this period. The code 991 will be printed on your license opposite the vehicle category in the column headed ‘restrictions/information.’

 

Source: MAGIreland

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